The Non-Story of Bottega Veneta’s No Logo

Bags from Italian luxury brand Bottega Veneta (part of the Gucci group) have recently moved into the pantheon of iconic accessories for women in the Japanese market. According to Nikkei, Japanese sales in 2006 increased almost 70% to reach ¥12 billion. In the June issue of CanCam, BV were tied with Hermès for the No. 4 spot (only behind LV, Gucci, and Chanel) in a poll of 100 readers about their favorite handbags. These objective numbers back up the anecdotal evidence of seeing the woven-leather bags pop up more and more across Tokyo over the last year. In an environment on the brink of Gucci and Louis Vuitton fatigue, brands like Bottega Veneta and Goyard have managed to win the hearts and minds of young women looking for fresh new possibilities in luxury.

The media spin on Bottega Veneta is that the brand’s success heralds a new era of no-logo luxury. BV bags do not brandish initials or logos, and this is an intentional strategy: A sign with the message “When Your Own Initials Are Enough” is located behind the cashier desk of their huge Ginza flagship store. The management claims to emphasize quality over easily-recognizable markings, and they are happy to announce that this is at the root of recent success. Japanese consumers, the conventional wisdom is barking, have lost interest in something as base and vulgar as logos.

The success of Bottega Veneta, however, says very little about new developments in Japanese consumer behavior. The logo vs. no logo debate is a red herring. The most representative and best selling Bottega bags feature a consistent woven texture that gives the brands a very unique visual identity. Even without logos or initials, the pattern/texture alone is able to act as asignifier for the bag’s make.

With the bags receiving so much press attention in women’s fashion magazines, the woven BV visual signifier has reached a wide enough social penetration to make the products “safe” for consumers. To be fair, logos themselves are never the appeal of a brand like Gucci of LV: It was always the safety in knowing that the signifier implied in that logo had widespread recognition. So the innovation of BV is not a change in consumer psychology as much as a slight expansion of the means of brand representation. Bottega Veneta may be more classy in its subtlety, but the company is not making a product that cannot be recognized.

Also, the success of Bottega Veneta resembles Japanese female consumer esteem for Hermès in recent years. The main lines of Louis Vuitton and Gucci have been unfortunately defined by their mass fans, and a certain group of well-to-do, upwardly-mobile women want to set themselves apart from the “luxury standard.” Bottega Veneta has been well-positioned to fill this need, and although the prices are slightly high for the important clerical sector, the prices tags are nowhere as exorbitant as Hermès. Like Chloé, the BV bags hit a price-range that creates distinction from the mass luxury sector without proving an impossible buy.

Of course, there are some Japanese female consumers who are not interested in whether peers can recognize the make of their bag, but the acceptance of Bottega Veneta with the CanCam set says that those who need social legitimatization for their products are as fine with a distinctive pattern as they are with a logo.

This article originally appeared on the Diamond Agency blog clast.

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One Response to “The Non-Story of Bottega Veneta’s No Logo”

  1. Evan Monaco Says:

    This is interesting and I’m happy to read it.

    For years I have thought this way about luxury.

    You can tell what make the Bottega Veneta bag is for sure, but it is best when one looks at the style and thinks …oh yes. …I know.

    Elegant rather than tacky!